HALE AO by JIMBO, Shigeru Visual Image, Hawaiian Culture and Music

Kaula ʻIli

(Puʻu Huluhulu・Puʻu O Hulu)

by Eliza Haaheo Holt, traditional

 

Hoʻomākaukau ko kaula ʻili

I luna o ka puʻu Kanakaleonui

E hoʻolohe i ke kani o nā manu

Oh never mind ua (ke) hina pū ua hiki nō

Oh never mind ua (ke) hina pū ua hiki nō

 

ʻO ʻoe ka i huia ihola

Ka manaʻo e pua puaʻi ʻala

Eia ʻo Puʻuohulu

Ulu nō wau ua hiki nō

Ulu nō wau ua hiki nō

<解説>
ハワイアンソングの中で、歌詞の解釈が最も悩む曲のひとつ。歌詞もひとによって微妙に違う。
以下は、サニー・チリングワースのアルバムに載っていた解説。とても興味深かったので転載させてもらった。オアフ島とハワイ島の地名が、なぜチャンポンで出てくるのか、その理由が書いてある。(カナカレオヌイの丘はハワイ島、プウオフルの丘はオアフ島)。

 

Also known as Pu'u Huluhulu and Kanaka Leo Nui, Hoomau Kau Kau Ko Kaula 'ili or Pu'u O Hulu, this long-time traditional paniolo (Hawaiian cowboy) favorite illustrates how traditional songs change as they travel from singer to singer or place to place.

 

Kaula 'ili apparently began as an O'ahu mele pana (song of place) that speaks of the rains at Ma'ili and the soft winds of Wai'anae. Over time, references to the Parker Ranch on the Big Island filtered in, centering on a handsome paniolo with his trusty kaula 'ili (lariat), riding over two hills, Pu'u Kanaka Leo Nui (Loud-voiced Man Hill) and Pu'u Huluhulu (Shaggy Hill). As paniolo singer and storyteller Clyde Halema'uma'u Sproat points out, riding over the volcanic soil on the Parker Ranch can be risky; small air pockets can crack, tripping the horse and throwing the rider. Yet, "Oh, never mind, ke hina pu (if we fall),"; the song says, ";ua hiki no."; It's okay. You get up and ride again. "I relate that to my life,"; says Sonny, who has been bravely battling cancer for the past several years. "When you're down, when you're sick, you just get up, forget about it and ride again.";

 

Sonny learned Kaula 'ili from his uncle, Harry Purdy, Jr., a longtime paniolo on the Parker Ranch. Like a number of other prominent ki ho'alu players, Sonny can trace his lineage back to several generations of Hawaiian cowboys, who were taught by Mexican vaqueros (cowboys) to rope and ride and play guitar in the 19th century. Ikua Purdy, the legendary Hawaiian roughrider who won the 1908 rodeo world championship in Cheyenne, Wyoming, is his granduncle.

 

「He Mele Aloha」の解説によると、エリザ・ホルトが作ったオアフ島ワイアナエの歌「Pu'uohulu」に、ハワイ島の誰かが歌詞(Ho'omākaukau〜のパート)を加えたのだという。

 

プウ・フルフルのタイトルでは英語とハワイ語がまざったバージョンがある。メロディはまったく同じだが、こうなると別物に近い。

 

Puʻu Huluhulu

 

The rain and the mist are all around me

The never ending rains of Māʻili

The thoughts of the rough land surround me

And the ghostly silence cuts right through me

 

Oh hill with the hair I long to see you

And down toward the old corral the herd will go

You're the land mark that guides us home Puʻu Huluhulu

Hill with the hair, Hawaiian cowboy loves you so

 

Then when we see the wild cattle

We'll drive them down to Puʻu Huluhulu

So get your lassos ready for the battle

And if you fall, never mind, you'll make it through

 

Hoʻomākaukau ko kaula ʻili

I luna o ka puʻu Kanakaleonui

E hoʻolohe i ke kani o nā manu

Oh never mind ke hina pū ua hiki nō

Oh never mind ke hina pū ua hiki nō

 

 

 

 

 

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